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I joined the animal protection movement a quarter of a century ago, moving from a government policy position to join the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) – now World Animal Protection – as its Regional Director for Europe. I arrived with my ‘rose-tinted glasses’ firmly in place; full of longing to work for a cause that really mattered to me.

It’s always inspiring to see professionals from a variety of fields coming together to achieve positive results for animals. That’s why I was more than enthused to attend the 3rd Annual Animal Abuse Summit in my community.

This week WAN is highlighting the work of the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO), an organization working on the ground in India to organize and empower the country’s animal protection movement through advocacy, capacity building, and networking. FIAPO’s Director of Programmes, Varda Mehrotra, was kind enough to take the time to answer our questions.

On Sunday, November 9, after 6 days of deliberation, the United Nations has moved to protect a number of species under the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS) international treaty. Notably, the UN also officially recognized the existence and importance of culture in cetaceans, which includes whales, dolphins and porpoises, by adopting a resolution to include cultural considerations when planning cetacean conservation measures. This decision will also create a scientific advisory group to look at the issue more closely.

One question that is often asked in international animal protection circles is: “Why is our movement taking so long to become a real force for social change?”

This is particularly striking when you compare ours with the modern environmental movement – a ‘newcomer on the block’, with its beginnings in the 1960s, but which has already gathered critical mass.

Many of us are aware of the popular saying that a law is only as good as its enforcement. But until recently, the average person had limited real-time options to help animals in peril. Enter savvy smartphone apps to the rescue. From the United States to China, technology is helping protect animals from illegal activities such as prohibited trade in wildlife and abuse and neglect of companion animals. And animal protection organizations around the globe are helping move the ball forward. In this blog post, World Animal Net profiles a few apps that are available to iPhone and Android users.

Fishing is an enormous industry. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimated that in 2012, global production of fish (including crustaceans and mollusks) reached 158 million metric tons. Approximately 91 million metric tons came from wild capture, a number that has remained relatively constant since 2006. Roughly 67 million metric tons come from aquaculture, or the industrial farming of fish. This number, unlike that for captured fish, has nearly doubled since 2003! 

Monday, 20 October 2014 18:26

Humane Education: Creating a Compassionate Future

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World Animal Net (WAN) has just released a new section of our web site – focusing on Humane Education (HE)!

On September 21, 2014, the historic People's Climate March brought some 400,000 people to the streets (with numerous marches in solidarity around the world) and WAN is proud to have been among them. Marchers aimed to show the United Nations that climate matters and to encourage the organization to take strong action on climate change at the 2014 Climate Summit, attended by heads of state. 

The field of animal law and legislation is rapidly expanding as countries around the globe prioritize the well-being of animals. But where does one go for information on existing laws and recent legal developments? World Animal Net has surveyed the field and come up with our top three picks.

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About the WAN Blog

The WAN blog allows us to share our expertise in the fields of policy, science, communications, management, and more in a manner that animal protection organizations can easily incorporate into their everyday work for animals. The blog also provides the opportunity to highlight important work of individual organizations and campaigns, and allows researchers, experts, and others outside of WAN to provide useful information to the animal protection community. 

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